Need an emergency vet? Go here: pets911.com

Need a rabbit rescue? Find contacts here or contact us

This website is devoted to the care and well-being of all rabbits, and focuses on pet rabbits kept as indoor members of the family.

Last site update: Wed Feb 25 01:52:51 EST 2015

Is That Bunny Wild?

Find A Wildlife Rehabilitator

Injured/Orphaned Wildlife

Orphaned Wildlife

What To Do

Wild Rabbits

Caring for Orphans

Caring for Families

Help Create Safe Passageways For Wildlife

Killer Highways

Safe Driving with Wildlife

Road Runners: The Deadly Fall Ritual of Animals Crossing Roads

The Kindness of Strangers: When To Leave Baby Wildlife Alone

Urban Wildlife Sanctuary

Orphaned Rabbit Care

Successful Wild Baby Rabbit Care/Rehabilitation (Part 1)

Successful Wild Baby Rabbit Care/Rehabilitation (Part 2)

Help! I've Found an Abandoned Wild Baby Rabbit!

How to Locate a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Fawns, baby rabbits should be left alone

Check out my book on pet rabbit care and socialization, and I'm always updating it. The book is copyright-protected but available for free, though I request a $1 donation for the bunnies and for my efforts. C'mon, what's a buck?

What To Do About Wildlife

A wild baby rabbit taken into domestic care has a 1% chance of survival.

Is That Bunny Wild?
Find A Wildlife Rehabilitator

This is a wild momma with her babies following close behind. This is the way wild bunnies should be, and it is NOT the way domestic bunnies should be.

A wild baby bunny taken into a domestic situation, for whatever reason including treatment of life-threatening injuries, has about a one percent chance of survival. Wild animals are equipped to survive on their own and in almost all cases they should either be left alone, or if they really need help, a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or veterinarian should handle it. Most vets are not licensed to treat wildlife, so you may need to call around to find a vet that can help.

A mother rabbit will only tend to her nest a couple of times a day and spend the rest of the day away from it, to prevent drawing predators to the nest. If you find a nest that looks undisturbed and the mother is nowhere in sight, that is her plan. She will be back within 24-48 hours maximum to check on and feed her babies.

If you have no other choice, or if you simply need to buy time, it may help to provide it with some hay with some real fur as bedding (perhaps from brushing your other bunnies). Real fur is especially comforting to orphaned wildlife, and it gives them the sense that they are with their mother and littermates. To keep it warm, you may also want to wrap the bunny in a small towel (with the hay and fur inside).

See also: Naturalists: Wildlife best left alone

(More to come...)

In the meantime, the following links are very good reading on what to do about wildlife in your area.


Recommended Reading:

The Human Society's article on what to do if you find injured or orphaned wildlife.

The House Rabbit Society's article on what to do if you find an orphaned baby bunny.

Wild rabbit nests are dug up by mistake, and now you have a litter of baby bunnies. Who you gonna call?

The House Rabbit Connection's article on what to do about wild rabbits.

What to do if you find an orphaned baby wild bird songbird or mammal.

The House Rabbit Society's reprint of how to care for domestic baby bunnies and their mom.

The Humane Society's article on doing your part to make the roads safe for the wildlife that need to cross.

The Humane Soiety's article on what the United States is currently doing about making the roads safer for wildlife.

The Humane Society's article on safe driving tips with wildlife, and what to do if about injured or dead wildlife on the roads.

The Humane Society's article on wildlife mortality in the Fall season.

The Humane Society's article on determining when wildlife really needs help and when it's better to leave them alone.

The HSUS's Urban Wildlife Sanctuary Program (UWSP) provides individuals and communities the opportunity to assess and improve their property's usefulness as a wildlife habitat

Trying to raise orphaned wild rabbit species (cottontails, hares, etc) is rarely a rewarding venture.

A thorough article on raising wild baby rabbits

A thorough article on raising wild baby rabbits

The House Rabbit Network's article on what to do and who to contact if you find a baby rabbit.

A good article on why to leave baby wildlife alone, including that you may inadvertantly draw predators to otherwise safe babies


Copyright ©2014
3 Bunnies Rabbit Resources
All Rights Reserved
About Us
Contact Us
Site Map


This site is supported strictly by donations from our readers


Last update: Wed Feb 25 01:52:51 EST 2015